New ACL Technique

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the prime stabilizer of the knee to prevent anterior instability. Ligaments are the “ropes” of the knee which connect bone-to-bone and stabilize the knee. When ligaments tear the two ends spring apart like a “torn guitarstring” and the ligament loses its blood supply and it dissolves. The patient will have an unstable knee without an ACL which can lead to a meniscus tear and early degenerative arthritis of the knee.
The reconstruction of an ACL tear utilizing the patients own tendons  (structures which connect muscle to bone) or a allograft (cadaver donor) is a successful procedure but one that, unfortunately, does not prevent and may accelerate the development of early degenerative arthritis. The reason for this is that in the past we have used a Trans-Tibial technique to perform our drill holes in the bone to stabilize the ligament. This technique cannot put the ACL graft back to its “Anatomic Footprint Position” and will change the function (kinematics) of the knee which will lead to early arthritis.
A new technique has been devised to create our bone tunnels in the femur and tibia at the “Anatomic Footprint Position” which enhances stability and restores the normal kinematics of the knee and prevents the development of early arthritis.
We routinely use this new “Anatomic” ACL reconstruction and our results have been fantastic! If you have an ACL tear, ask your surgeon if they use the new “Anatomic reconstruction technique” and if they do not, get a second opinion with us to discuss the new technique and how it will improve the long-term outcome of you surgical result!

Keep moving!
Dr. Sisto

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About djsisto
Orthopedic Surgeon at the Los Angeles Orthopaedic Institute

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